When it comes to the latest trends in women's apparel, there's no better place to shop till you drop than Downtown Chucktown. And if you're searching for the finest threads in Thunderbolt, look no further than Copper Penny - the Lowcountry's go-to shop for anyone that has a passion for fashion.

We have been dressing women in Thunderbolt for over 34 years and offer upscale designer collections curated with a Southern eye. Here, women from around the United States discover sophisticated, effortless beauty for every season. Whether you're looking for a sassy new dress to impress that special someone or the perfect outfit for your next vacation, your options are endless at Copper Penny.

With easy-to-find locations close to Thunderbolt's hottest spots, our curated selection of the newest, most popular women's clothing lines reflects the effortless glamour of Thunderbolt. Whether you're a tidy professional or a fierce trend-setter, our goal is to help you find the perfect look for your own unique style. With designer brands like CK Bradley and Holst & Lee on hand year-round, finding your new look is easy and fun when you visit Copper Penny.

Our clothing lines give ladies a refreshing mix of one-of-a-kind authenticity with real wearability, allowing them to shine with confidence and style all year long. So, go ahead and spoil yourself - you deserve to look like a million bucks!

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Find the Perfect Dress to Impress

Diamonds are pretty and all, but honestly? Dresses are a girl's best friend. Dresses are fun, comfortable, and versatile. At Copper Penny, they're also fashionable and cute. We have a huge selection of women's dresses in Thunderbolt, GA, from stylistic sheath dresses to drop-waist styles that will make your girlfriends jealous.

We offer several styles and shapes from which you can pick. Not sure what style fits best?

It all starts at the waist:

 Boutique Clothing Thunderbolt, GA
 Boutique Dresses Thunderbolt, GA

A-Line Waist

These dresses are made to fit your waist and then gradually flare out towards the hem. A-line dresses are excellent for minimizing thighs, hips, and midsections while pulling the eyes to your bust. This style of dress is a great fit for almost any body type. There's a reason why so many brides settle on A-Line dresses for their big day! With plenty of varieties, this is a kind of dress that you can wear again and again.

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 Cloths Shop Thunderbolt, GA

Empire Waist

Like the A-Line style, empire dresses are made to fit through your bust. Rather than creating a distinctly angular shape like the A-Line, the Empire style flows from the bust down. This is another kind of dress that fits many body types. From curvy to apple body shapes, the Empire draws focus to your bust and minimizes everything else. For lovely ladies on the shorter side, this style defines your silhouette, especially if you choose a maxi length dress.

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 Cloths For Women Thunderbolt, GA

Drop Waist

A throwback to the roaring 20's style flapper dresses, Drop Waist dresses look best on lean, athletic bodies that don't have too many curves in the hip area. The key to pulling off a Drop Waist style dress is to ensure that it's not hugging you. This dress is best worn when it is able to hang freely on your body.

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Once you know the kind of waist that fits your body type, it's time to find your shape. A few of our most popular dress shapes include:

Fit & Flare Dresses in Thunderbolt

Any clothing store for women in Thunderbolt, GA, worth its salt, will have plenty of fit & flare dresses for you to try. This common-shaped dress is one of the most popular on the market, mainly because they look great on every woman, regardless of age or shape. A timeless choice, fit & flare dresses fit through the bodice and flare out just below your hip. This helps develop a balanced, slimming silhouette for most women. If you want to accentuate your best assets and hide everything else, ask our experienced fashionistas to show you some the most popular fit & flare dresses at Copper Penny.
Time to start doing your happy dance! Fit & flare dresses have very balanced proportions, making them a true winner for every body type. Women with athletic builds love this dress for the extra curves. Women with apple-shaped bodies love how fit & flare dresses define their waistlines. Because this dress already looks like an hourglass on the hanger, it will be a natural fit for ladies with such a figure.
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 Clothing Stores Thunderbolt, GA
 Fashion Stores Thunderbolt, GA

Shift Dresses in Thunderbolt

Shift dresses are typically rectangular in shape and tend to be comfy and forgiving since they aren't fitted. Also called a column dress, the shift dress is a great choice for polished professionals needing a conservative, fashionable outfit for work.
These dresses look fabulous on women with athletic, lean shapes and women with an apple-like figure. This kind of dress doesn't work well with a belt, so ladies with an hourglass figure may not be able to show off their curves in a shift. Try pairing this dress with a nice pair of heels for a beautiful new look!
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Wrap Dresses in Thunderbolt

Wrap dresses are one of the most popular styles on the market, because they give ladies of most shapes and sizes a flattering, fashionable dress option.
If you have an hourglass, apple, or generally curvy body shape, you're going to love wrap dresses. This style of dress offers a natural waist while placing emphasis on your bust. Wrap dresses give you a balanced silhouette and, with a knee-length fit, are great for any type of color or style, both day and nightwear.
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 Fashion Boutique Thunderbolt, GA

Timeless Tops for Every Style

Unless you're feeling extra sassy, chances are you're wearing a top at this very moment. Tops are garments that cover the top half of your body. At Copper Penny, we have an endless selection of tops in a wide range of styles - from basic tees to blouses and everything in between. If you're looking for the highest quality women's tops in Thunderbolt, GA, you just hit the jackpot!

With that said, finding the right top for the right occasion is easier said than done. However, at Copper Penny, we make finding the right top fun. Whether you're looking for a top that makes a statement or you need a classic button-down for a subdued style, we've got your back. We only carry the most popular tops from the best brands and designers around the world.

 Ladies Clothing Thunderbolt, GA

Here are just of our most popular tops:

 Online Boutique Thunderbolt, GA

Women's Poplin Tops in Thunderbolt

Sometimes called broadcloth tops, poplins have classic characteristics and are often woven with an over/under weave. This kind of weave gives more substance to your top while also giving you room to breathe. Poplin shirts are typically soft and smooth, and are great for everyday business attire, some formal occasions, and for certain ceremonies. Sweet and feminine, our Bruna poplin eyelet bib top features ruffles at the sleeves and an eyelet lace yoke at the front. Pair your poplin with your favorite pair of shorts or jeans for a contemporary, relaxed look.

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Boutique Thunderbolt, GA

Women's Wrap Tops in Thunderbolt

Great for wearing solo or layered over a camisole or tank top, wrap tops are lightweight, versatile, and great for many different occasions. Wrap tops go well with jeans, maxi dresses, and high-waisted jeans or trousers. Our V-Neck Wrap SLV Top by Jayden is uber-popular at Copper Penny and the perfect choice for dressing down or dressing up. The choice is yours!

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 Boutique Clothing Thunderbolt, GA

Women's Off the Shoulder Tops in Thunderbolt

For a dose of feminine fashion, be sure you add an off-the-shoulder top to your everyday wardrobe. A casual, sexy choice, off-the-shoulder tops have unique necklines that cut across your upper arms and chest, leaving your shoulders bare. The result is a flirty flash of skin, which elongates your neck and gives a relaxed, "daytime casual" look. Our Nola off-the-shoulder top pairs perfectly with shorts or even a flowy skirt and is hand-woven in Spain using Jacquard fabric.

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 Boutique Dresses Thunderbolt, GA

Women's Tank Tops in Thunderbolt

Who doesn't love a good tank top?! Tank tops are lightweight, versatile, and equally great for lounging in the yard or running errands on weekends. Tank tops lend an air of simplicity to your outfit and can be styled in endless ways. Take our Velvet Heart Victory Tank, for instance. This tank is a refreshing update on our classic sleeveless tank top, complete with fray details and a scoop neck. Throw in the fact that it's machine washable, and you have a wardrobe winner.

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Having trouble finding the best top for your size and style? As the most trusted women's clothing boutique in Thunderbolt, GA, Copper Penny has helped women discover new looks in the Lowcountry for more than two decades. We take pride in providing a personalized, boutique experience for our customers. If you have questions, give us a call or swing by one of our locations. We would be happy to give you our professional opinion.

Until then, here's a quick guide you can follow to help you find the right fit for your women's top in Thunderbolt:

How to Find the Right Fit for Your Women's Top

When choosing a women's top for your outfit, you have to consider how comfortable, confident, and beautiful you will feel. The best way to feel your best in an outfit is to make sure it fits correctly. To get started, you'll want to take your measurements. For most women's tops, the best areas to focus on are your hips, waist, and chest.

  • Hip Measurements: Measuring your hips is fairly easy. Take your measuring tape and use it to wrap around the widest area of your hips.
  • Waist Measurements: Take your measuring tape and place it at the very top of your hip bone. Wrap it all the way around your body. Try to keep your measuring tape in line with your belly button. For the most accurate measurements, stand up straight and breathe normally.
  • Chest Measurements: For an accurate chest measurement, take the end of your measuring tape and place it on the fullest area of your bust. From there, wrap the tape around your body, under your armpits, and around the blades of your shoulders. Then, wrap the tape tightly from the back of your body to the front, where you started.
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 Cloths Shop Thunderbolt, GA

Need help measuring? Swing by Copper Penny and ask one of our friendly sales associates to help you out! While you're there, don't forget to check out our huge selection of women's tops in Thunderbolt, GA.

Contact Us

Looking to take your style to the next level? You can also get in touch with a personal stylist directly from our website. With a personal stylist by your side, you can find stunning looks for specific occasions, using comfortable clothing in your favorite colors and cuts. Copper Penny is your one-stop-shop for fashionable, fun, fabulous designer clothing in Thunderbolt. But don't take our word for it – come see for yourself!

Latest News in Thunderbolt, GA

City of Thunderbolt brings composting, conservation efforts to residents

While the Saturday morning sun beat down on Savannah during one of its hottest weekends this summer, Maria Vaughan and her husband Michael Wedum chatted outside to Thunderbolt residents for hours about the benefits of recycling their food waste.The couple, co-founders of Savannah-based food waste composting program ...

While the Saturday morning sun beat down on Savannah during one of its hottest weekends this summer, Maria Vaughan and her husband Michael Wedum chatted outside to Thunderbolt residents for hours about the benefits of recycling their food waste.

The couple, co-founders of Savannah-based food waste composting program Code of Return (COR) Compost, kicked off a pilot program with Thunderbolt as part of the city's larger conservation effort in the works. After the weekend, Vaughan said they had eight resident sign-ups and at least three restaurants willing to participate in the 60-day composting pilot.

Not only is it an easy way to combat climate change, Vaughan explained, but it's also, ultimately, cost effective for the city.

Rising temperatures:Savannah goes from hot to hotter as climate warms

Edward Drohan, Thunderbolt council member, said he is in the early stages of formulating a conservation plan for the town of about 2,600 and cites slowly increasing water costs as one of the reasons for doing so.

"There's a dual purpose," said Drohan. "There's an overarching conservation goal, which has to do with being good to the earth. Whereas it relates to the water system, it is known that compostables that go down the drain are damaging to the system. Therefore, compostables that don't go down the drain actually help the system last longer and work better."

How does COR Compost work:Compost business looks to expand

Residents and restaurants jump on the composting wagon

"I never thought about composting because I only thought about it in the context of a garden," said Stephen Yost, a Thunderbolt resident. "Knowing that somebody is collecting stuff, it helped spark that idea that maybe we should be doing this."

Vaughan and Wedum laid out the process for households that want to participate: All it takes is throwing your food scraps into a different container instead of in the trash where it will be taken to methane-producing landfills or down the sink where it's bound to damage pipes.

COR Compost, which started its operations in 2019, has had over 600 resident sign-ups and 20 commercial accounts, most of which are downtown Savannah restaurants.

Residents who sign up receive a commercial food-grade bucket in which they can place their kitchen waste. They can either drop the contents off at the Forsyth Farmers' Market every Saturday at COR Compost's stand or at one of three self-serve stations across the city. Curbside pick-up is also available to residents for a fee.

How to sign up:Compost company wants your food waste

Those who use the newest self-serve station by Wesley Oak United Methodist Church in Thunderbolt can receive a free cup of coffee from Finches Sandwiches and Sundries, the restaurant across the street.

Those who would still like to sign up can do so online (corcompost.com/signup) or at the Forsyth Farmers' Market from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

"We had a lot of residents from the islands interested, but logistically it didn't make sense," said Vaughan.

Now, with a closer drop-off station in Thunderbolt, Chatham County residents on the east side can participate much easier.

Town restaurants, Finches, Chiriya's Thai Cuisine and Tubby's Tank House will be taking part in a free two-month composting trial, which is about how long it takes for food waste to fully decompose on COR Compost's farm. The usual process takes four to five months, but COR's solar-powered aeration system cuts that time in half, said Vaughan.

At the end of the trial, restaurants will get to see their previous food waste in composted form — a dark, nutrient-rich soil.

Depending on the results from this trial period, COR Compost and Atlantic Waste, which handles waste management for the city, could potentially coordinate and work with businesses in a more formal arrangement.

"They're pioneering this right now for the restaurants," said Finches co-owner Rebecca Matthews. "There's been nobody else who's approached us and said, 'hey there's a better way.'"

Matthews, who composts at home already, said she's excited to start incorporating it into her business, as well.

"For our millennial toast that we do, which is an avocado toast, we go through like a hundred avocados every couple of days, so that's a lot of waste," said Matthews.

Chiriya Moore, who runs Chiriya's Thai Cuisine, said she does her own composting in her garden behind the restaurant, but is participating in the pilot program because she believes the city needs to do more with recycling and composting.

"I don't throw anything away," she said as she crushed a bag of egg shells beneath her feet and gestured towards the dirt, which, along with the egg shells, is speckled with scraps of vegetables and banana leaves.

"If you don't do it now [recycling, composting], it's going to become a big problem," said Moore. "I do what I can now."

Saving dollars and the earth

According to the USDA, a person, on average, produces about a pound of food waste per day.

Using conservative estimates based on that statistic, the town of Thunderbolt produces about 91,000 pounds (or 45.5 tons) of food waste per year that goes down the drain, said Drohan.

Extrapolate that to the rest of the county, and that's a lot of food waste in the pipes.

A study from Georgia Southern University's Center for Business Analytics and Economic Research found that the city of Savannah produced about a total of 60,900 tons of compostable waste and, within that, 22,800 tons of food waste in 2016.

Right now, COR composts about 480 tons on their one acre farm.

"With the right support for this movement we could take away 10% of the city landfill's compostable material on just the first tier of becoming a commercially regulated facility," said Wedum.

Along with composting, the city is mapping out a plan to conserve water, a long-term effort that municipalities around Savannah are working on.

"For a water system, you've got to be thinking 50 years down the road," said Drohan, "you can't let it get to a point where, it doesn't matter how much money you have or how hard you work, you're going to have a crisis."

On a local level, Drohan said this will save Thunderbolt resident's tax dollars. Conserving water means drawing less from the City Savannah as well, which costs about 2.5 times as much as the city's main source of water.

"We're trying to avoid damage to the infrastructure, we're trying to stretch tax dollars and we're trying to do well for the earth," said Drohan.

Vaughan echoes that idea when it comes to composting. In addition to environmental benefits, it can be a fiscal advantage.

"There's actually a large revenue that we're missing out on by just throwing it in a landfill," said Vaughan. "We can literally take half of what our waste is and turn it into a product. This is the solution to reamend our soil and have something for the future."

COR Compost received a donation of 40 composting buckets. Those who would like to sign up for free can do so while supplies last by visiting corcompost.com/signup. To support the organization, go to corcompost.com/support.

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Legal battle over church property a sign of the times, experts say

SAVANNAH, Ga. (WTOC) - A Georgia church is battling in court for the right to sell its own property. Their opponent? Their own now-former larger church organization.Members of St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in Thunderbolt say they are devastated. The church, which has less than a dozen members, has been a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America (ELCA) for decades.But Reverend Steve Schulte tells WTOC as soon as the larger church organization found out they planned to sell their property and downsize, it kicked th...

SAVANNAH, Ga. (WTOC) - A Georgia church is battling in court for the right to sell its own property. Their opponent? Their own now-former larger church organization.

Members of St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in Thunderbolt say they are devastated. The church, which has less than a dozen members, has been a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America (ELCA) for decades.

But Reverend Steve Schulte tells WTOC as soon as the larger church organization found out they planned to sell their property and downsize, it kicked the congregation out of the denomination and sued them over the property, effectively blocking the sale.

Now, more than a year into this battle, Rev. Schulte says it’s become bigger than just their church.

“We are fighting for every small congregation that’s out there,” Schulte said. “A bishop can come in and close you, and take your property, and then you have nothing left.”

Schulte has led St. Luke’s for almost 30 years. Founded as a Lutheran church back in 1931, Schulte says the congregation joined the ELCA when it formed in 1988.

St. Luke’s had been a member of a different Lutheran organization, which merged to form the ELCA that year.

Like many other churches, St. Luke’s church body has shrunk over the years. They’re now down to just 8 members. The congregation has sold-off much of its former property over the year, including its old place of worship.

But now, Schulte says the congregation is too small for its current place of worship. So, when a neighbor offered to buy the property for $200,000, Schulte said they jumped at the opportunity.

“Out of courtesy we informed the bishop that we were going to sell the property. We have never had a bishop’s approval in the past, ever,” Schulte said.

The church owns the deed to its property, and its constitution states that it has the right to sell it. But Schulte says that wasn’t enough for Bishop Kevin Strickland, who oversees the ELCA’s Southeast region.

He says Strickland asked them to let the ELCA control the sale - and the money from it.

“And we said to him, no. We are not going to listen to you,” Schulte said. “And when he interfered with that transaction, the potential buyers backed out for fear of lawsuits.”

The suit, filed by the ELCA last June in Chatham County Superior Court, alleges that St. Luke’s has, “ceased to meaningfully exist.” It also says the ELCA is suing to, quote, “protect and preserve any undisposed assets in an orderly manner.”

Schulte thinks it’s all about the money.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if small churches closing is another way for big churches to make money.”

But not everyone sees it that way. Reverend Steven Martin, founder of The Lakelands Institute... a national consulting firm for churches... says he’s familiar with these kinds of disputes.

“I would question the narrative that the ELCA just kind of canceled and kicked out a church,” Martin said. “It’s always more complicated than that.”

Martin says he doesn’t think a major church like the ELCA would try to profit from church closures.

“It’s really a minefield for them. And selling church property, or redeveloping church property, is never ever a simple matter,” he added.

Schulte says, for his small church, it’s not about the money. It’s about staying true to their Christian principles.

“I have been a Lutheran my entire life,” Schulte said. “These people here have been Lutherans for a very long time. And for someone to come in and say, ‘you’re out of here!’ is just wrong.”

On Thursday, WTOC heard from the ELCA’s attorney, who represents Bishop Kevin Strickland.

Attorney Charles Bridgers said, quote... “I can confirm that a final written document has been executed by St. Luke’s and the Synod. St. Luke’s is no longer a congregation within the ELCA. Mr. Schulte is no longer on the of ELCA roster of pastors...”

WTOC pressed Bridgers, and he said that both sides have agreed not to share any more details about the agreement. We also reached out to St. Luke’s, but have not heard back.

This story is part of a trend of church property disputes. Just last month, the South Carolina Supreme Court returned 14 church properties to the Episcopal Church - but ruled that 15 other churches could keep their properties.

The state’s high court ruled that those 15 churches had not created a trust in favor of the national church... and therefore could keep their real estate.

The Lakelands Institute predicts as many as 100,000 churches could close across the U.S. over the next several years. They say the pandemic has accelerated that trend.

Copyright 2022 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Community says goodbye to closing Thunderbolt School

Cliff Miller walked the timeworn halls of Thunderbolt Elementary School on Sunday afternoon and reminisced with the staff, students and alumni who gathered for a closing ceremony."I was in Mrs. McCracken's fifth-grade class right here," he said. "Mrs. McCracken used to let my dog come in and sit with me during the day. Everywhere I went, the dog went, except the lunch room. She wouldn't allow that."Sixty-one-year-old Thunderbolt School will close at the end of the 2016-2017 school year. Studen...

Cliff Miller walked the timeworn halls of Thunderbolt Elementary School on Sunday afternoon and reminisced with the staff, students and alumni who gathered for a closing ceremony.

"I was in Mrs. McCracken's fifth-grade class right here," he said. "Mrs. McCracken used to let my dog come in and sit with me during the day. Everywhere I went, the dog went, except the lunch room. She wouldn't allow that."

Sixty-one-year-old Thunderbolt School will close at the end of the 2016-2017 school year. Students from the old school in the small fishing village will attend the newly constructed Low Elementary school next year. Passage of an education sales tax extension in 2011 enabled the district to generate $30.6 million to rebuild the Low Elementary campus large enough to accommodate both the Low and Thunderbolt student populations.

The Thunderbolt community came out to say goodbye Sunday.

"This is the only school I've ever gone to and to me it is my family," said Aiden Mason Harvey, a Thunderbolt student.

Thunderbolt's first public school was a one-room school house. When it opened in 1890, there was one teacher with 68 students. Nancy Edinger Hiers remembers when the current school first opened in 1956.

"I was in third grade and Mrs. Carter was my teacher," Hiers said. "I remember coming over from the old school on Mechanics Avenue."

Her cousin Beth Feltovic Toomer lived just across from Thunderbolt School and went to school there from first through sixth grade.

"It was a lot different then," she said. "This gym wasn't here and the library was just an old classroom. I've got certificates for helping to put books away."

Current Principal Susan Ambrose organized Sunday's ceremony like a reunion. Former students were given alumni ribbons. Students decorated the halls with photos and school history details. Classrooms were opened so teachers could reminisce with their past students. Former faculty and staff returned to take one last look at the leaky, flood-prone school they had all grown to love.

Past principals Camille O'Neill, Shannon Floyd, Vicki Bryant and Kim Newman returned for the celebration and Jacob Wilson, III, who was hired earlier this year to serve as principal of the merged Low and Thunderbolt student bodies, attended the ceremony as well.

Thunderbolt parent Elizabeth Powell said she is sad that a school that created so many happy memories is closing, but she is happy the large new Low School will be able to provide even more children with love, care and a firm academic foundation.

Markayla Green ran up and hugged teacher Emily Morgan. She was in Morgan's third grade class when she first started teaching at Thunderbolt.

"Thunderbolt was just what I imagined when I changed careers and went back to school to get a master's degree in special education," Morgan said. "Thunderbolt was just what I imagined teaching should be. There will never be another school like it."

The Bitteroots are bringing their new, old sound and album to Coach's Corner in Thunderbolt

For Do SavannahCoach’s Corner on Thunderbolt Island has been hosting a steady run of of excellent tribute bands lately, but sometimes it’s nice to hear a group play original music, too.Atlanta rockers The Bitteroots may have started out as a cover band when they formed in 2008, but they have released six albums of original material in the intervening years, and are bringing their unique sound and catalogue of great songs to Coach’s Corner&rsquo...

For Do Savannah

Coach’s Corner on Thunderbolt Island has been hosting a steady run of of excellent tribute bands lately, but sometimes it’s nice to hear a group play original music, too.

Atlanta rockers The Bitteroots may have started out as a cover band when they formed in 2008, but they have released six albums of original material in the intervening years, and are bringing their unique sound and catalogue of great songs to Coach’s Corner’s Soundgarden Stage.

The Bitteroots have drawn comparison to the Tedeschi Trucks Band, Melissa Etheridge and Janis Joplin, and for good reason. Singer Laura Dee carries the tunes with powerful, classic-rock pipes.

More:The Rocketman comes to Savannah as Elton Live! performs at Coach's Corner

“She’s actually the fourth singer we had, but the first three each only did three shows,” said Bill Taylor, bassist and co-founder of The Bitteroots, when talking about how the band lucked out in recruiting Dee.

Another addition to the band that solidified their sound was saxophonist Darren Nuhfer, who joined in 2014.

“He’s sort of our secret weapon,” explained Taylor. “Before Darren joined, we were a straight ahead guitar band. Darren approaches sax in a little bit unique way in that he plays sax with a full effects pedal. Sometimes he plays like a lead guitar, and other times he plays like what you would normally equate with a keyboard player. He adds all these textures and it’s a really interesting sound. In a lot of ways it’s become somewhat of the Bitterroots’ unique sound. Without Darren we’re a driving rock band, but he brings this element of additional textures that you wouldn’t expect just looking at a sax.”

With drummer and co-founder Mike Davis, and guitarist PJ Poellnitz, as well, the Bitteroots have evolved over the last fourteen years and thus wanted their latest album, “Try Me Again,” released last April, to be a reflection of their current iteration.

More:Weedeater is back in Savannah to rattle the walls of El Rocko with their brand of 'cave metal'

“It is actually re-recorded recordings of some of our favorite songs from previous albums,” said Taylor.

“Try Me Again” came about when The Bitteroots were stuck at home during the COVID pandemic. Taylor and his bandmates realized that the band had changed so much over the years that their early recordings didn’t sound like them anymore, nor did they have the production quality that the band had become accustomed to.

So, The Bitteroots picked thirteen of their favorite songs and revisited them.

“Actually, if you come see a Bitteroots show, those songs on the new album sound like the Bitteroots now. That was one of our biggest challenges is that people would come to our shows, then they’d listen to our music on Spotify or buy a CD and those records were recorded with different instrumentation, different personnel, and we just wanted something a little tighter, a little more modern and polished.”

More:Savannah's hip-hop scene is ready to enter the conversation with fresh acts, more opportunities

The Bitteroots have become regulars on festival stages like Atlanta Dogwood Festival, the Sweetwater 420 Festival, the Summer Shade Festival, the Inman Park Festival, Stone Mountain Park’s Yellow Daisy Festival, and The Amplify Decatur Music Festival.

They have also shared the stage big artists like Kool & The Gang, Mavis Staples, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco), Everclear, Drivin’ N Cryin’, and the Freddy Jones Band. With years of touring and festival experience, the Bitterroots have honed themselves into a formidable live band.

“We do long shows,” promised Taylor. “Prior to COVID it was common for us to do three hour shows.”

“In all honesty, we’re a little out of practice for doing three hours,” Taylor added with a chuckle. “Maybe we’ll do 2 one and a half hour sets. We hope we have a huge crowd there, with people who want to have a good time, dance, and have some cocktails. We’re looking forward to seeing a few smiles.”

IF YOU GO

WHAT: The Bitteroots

WHEN: Friday, Aug. 20 at 7 p.m.

WHERE: Coach’s Corner, 3016 E. Victory Drive

COST: $25

INFO: thebitterroots.com

The Braves teepee is back: Coach's Corner keeps the tradition alive as MLB playoffs begin

THUNDERBOLT, Ga. —The Major League Baseball postseason will begin Tuesday with the Wildcard Playoff Round.And that means the return of a second-season tradition in Thunderbolt.It’s become a familiar site in the first few days of October, a teepee erected at Coach’s Corner in Thunderbolt.The structure has gone up every year that the Atlanta Braves have made the playoffs since 1991.TRENDING STORIESAnd they’re looking forward to another opportuni...

THUNDERBOLT, Ga. —

The Major League Baseball postseason will begin Tuesday with the Wildcard Playoff Round.

And that means the return of a second-season tradition in Thunderbolt.

It’s become a familiar site in the first few days of October, a teepee erected at Coach’s Corner in Thunderbolt.

The structure has gone up every year that the Atlanta Braves have made the playoffs since 1991.

TRENDING STORIES

And they’re looking forward to another opportunity to do it again.

“We’re really excited," said Lawrence Bennett, the organizer of Coach's Corner Teepee. "We only have a few more things to do on our punch list, and it’s going to be great. The playoffs are going to be awesome, the Braves are going to kick butt and we’re going to have a really good time up here.”

But it’s not just about cheering on the Braves, it’s also about helping out a worthy cause. You can pay for an opportunity to watch the game in the teepee, with proceeds going to benefit the nonprofit Help Save One of Our Own.

“Everything is tax deductible. Every dime goes to somebody in need in our community," said Bennett. "It all stays local, and we’re real proud of it.”

A year ago, because of the Braves' early exit from the playoffs, they didn’t raise nearly as much money as they had hoped for during that particular run. This year, though, they’re optimistic, thinking the Braves will have a run all the way to the World Series and in turn, that will mean more opportunities to raise more money for the charity.

“We do have a goal that we’re trying to raise money for Help Save One of Our Own," said Bennett. "It was cut a little short last year because the Braves exited early. We really want to hit our mark and raise as much money as we can.”

Now, even though the Braves' first playoff game is not until Saturday, Coach's Corner will be manning the teepee 24 hours a day starting Tuesday, the same day the MLB Wildcard Playoffs begin.

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