When it comes to the latest trends in women's apparel, there's no better place to shop till you drop than Downtown Chucktown. And if you're searching for the finest threads in Piedmont, look no further than Copper Penny - the Lowcountry's go-to shop for anyone that has a passion for fashion.

We have been dressing women in Piedmont for over 34 years and offer upscale designer collections curated with a Southern eye. Here, women from around the United States discover sophisticated, effortless beauty for every season. Whether you're looking for a sassy new dress to impress that special someone or the perfect outfit for your next vacation, your options are endless at Copper Penny.

With easy-to-find locations close to Piedmont's hottest spots, our curated selection of the newest, most popular women's clothing lines reflects the effortless glamour of Piedmont. Whether you're a tidy professional or a fierce trend-setter, our goal is to help you find the perfect look for your own unique style. With designer brands like CK Bradley and Holst & Lee on hand year-round, finding your new look is easy and fun when you visit Copper Penny.

Our clothing lines give ladies a refreshing mix of one-of-a-kind authenticity with real wearability, allowing them to shine with confidence and style all year long. So, go ahead and spoil yourself - you deserve to look like a million bucks!

Areas Near Our Stores

Find the Perfect Dress to Impress

Diamonds are pretty and all, but honestly? Dresses are a girl's best friend. Dresses are fun, comfortable, and versatile. At Copper Penny, they're also fashionable and cute. We have a huge selection of women's dresses in Piedmont, SC, from stylistic sheath dresses to drop-waist styles that will make your girlfriends jealous.

We offer several styles and shapes from which you can pick. Not sure what style fits best?

It all starts at the waist:

 Boutique Clothing Piedmont, SC
 Boutique Dresses Piedmont, SC

A-Line Waist

These dresses are made to fit your waist and then gradually flare out towards the hem. A-line dresses are excellent for minimizing thighs, hips, and midsections while pulling the eyes to your bust. This style of dress is a great fit for almost any body type. There's a reason why so many brides settle on A-Line dresses for their big day! With plenty of varieties, this is a kind of dress that you can wear again and again.

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 Cloths Shop Piedmont, SC

Empire Waist

Like the A-Line style, empire dresses are made to fit through your bust. Rather than creating a distinctly angular shape like the A-Line, the Empire style flows from the bust down. This is another kind of dress that fits many body types. From curvy to apple body shapes, the Empire draws focus to your bust and minimizes everything else. For lovely ladies on the shorter side, this style defines your silhouette, especially if you choose a maxi length dress.

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 Cloths For Women Piedmont, SC

Drop Waist

A throwback to the roaring 20's style flapper dresses, Drop Waist dresses look best on lean, athletic bodies that don't have too many curves in the hip area. The key to pulling off a Drop Waist style dress is to ensure that it's not hugging you. This dress is best worn when it is able to hang freely on your body.

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Once you know the kind of waist that fits your body type, it's time to find your shape. A few of our most popular dress shapes include:

Fit & Flare Dresses in Piedmont

Any clothing store for women in Piedmont, SC, worth its salt, will have plenty of fit & flare dresses for you to try. This common-shaped dress is one of the most popular on the market, mainly because they look great on every woman, regardless of age or shape. A timeless choice, fit & flare dresses fit through the bodice and flare out just below your hip. This helps develop a balanced, slimming silhouette for most women. If you want to accentuate your best assets and hide everything else, ask our experienced fashionistas to show you some the most popular fit & flare dresses at Copper Penny.
Time to start doing your happy dance! Fit & flare dresses have very balanced proportions, making them a true winner for every body type. Women with athletic builds love this dress for the extra curves. Women with apple-shaped bodies love how fit & flare dresses define their waistlines. Because this dress already looks like an hourglass on the hanger, it will be a natural fit for ladies with such a figure.
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 Clothing Stores Piedmont, SC
 Fashion Stores Piedmont, SC

Shift Dresses in Piedmont

Shift dresses are typically rectangular in shape and tend to be comfy and forgiving since they aren't fitted. Also called a column dress, the shift dress is a great choice for polished professionals needing a conservative, fashionable outfit for work.
These dresses look fabulous on women with athletic, lean shapes and women with an apple-like figure. This kind of dress doesn't work well with a belt, so ladies with an hourglass figure may not be able to show off their curves in a shift. Try pairing this dress with a nice pair of heels for a beautiful new look!
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Wrap Dresses in Piedmont

Wrap dresses are one of the most popular styles on the market, because they give ladies of most shapes and sizes a flattering, fashionable dress option.
If you have an hourglass, apple, or generally curvy body shape, you're going to love wrap dresses. This style of dress offers a natural waist while placing emphasis on your bust. Wrap dresses give you a balanced silhouette and, with a knee-length fit, are great for any type of color or style, both day and nightwear.
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 Fashion Boutique Piedmont, SC

Timeless Tops for Every Style

Unless you're feeling extra sassy, chances are you're wearing a top at this very moment. Tops are garments that cover the top half of your body. At Copper Penny, we have an endless selection of tops in a wide range of styles - from basic tees to blouses and everything in between. If you're looking for the highest quality women's tops in Piedmont, SC, you just hit the jackpot!

With that said, finding the right top for the right occasion is easier said than done. However, at Copper Penny, we make finding the right top fun. Whether you're looking for a top that makes a statement or you need a classic button-down for a subdued style, we've got your back. We only carry the most popular tops from the best brands and designers around the world.

 Ladies Clothing Piedmont, SC

Here are just of our most popular tops:

 Online Boutique Piedmont, SC

Women's Poplin Tops in Piedmont

Sometimes called broadcloth tops, poplins have classic characteristics and are often woven with an over/under weave. This kind of weave gives more substance to your top while also giving you room to breathe. Poplin shirts are typically soft and smooth, and are great for everyday business attire, some formal occasions, and for certain ceremonies. Sweet and feminine, our Bruna poplin eyelet bib top features ruffles at the sleeves and an eyelet lace yoke at the front. Pair your poplin with your favorite pair of shorts or jeans for a contemporary, relaxed look.

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Boutique Piedmont, SC

Women's Wrap Tops in Piedmont

Great for wearing solo or layered over a camisole or tank top, wrap tops are lightweight, versatile, and great for many different occasions. Wrap tops go well with jeans, maxi dresses, and high-waisted jeans or trousers. Our V-Neck Wrap SLV Top by Jayden is uber-popular at Copper Penny and the perfect choice for dressing down or dressing up. The choice is yours!

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 Boutique Clothing Piedmont, SC

Women's Off the Shoulder Tops in Piedmont

For a dose of feminine fashion, be sure you add an off-the-shoulder top to your everyday wardrobe. A casual, sexy choice, off-the-shoulder tops have unique necklines that cut across your upper arms and chest, leaving your shoulders bare. The result is a flirty flash of skin, which elongates your neck and gives a relaxed, "daytime casual" look. Our Nola off-the-shoulder top pairs perfectly with shorts or even a flowy skirt and is hand-woven in Spain using Jacquard fabric.

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 Boutique Dresses Piedmont, SC

Women's Tank Tops in Piedmont

Who doesn't love a good tank top?! Tank tops are lightweight, versatile, and equally great for lounging in the yard or running errands on weekends. Tank tops lend an air of simplicity to your outfit and can be styled in endless ways. Take our Velvet Heart Victory Tank, for instance. This tank is a refreshing update on our classic sleeveless tank top, complete with fray details and a scoop neck. Throw in the fact that it's machine washable, and you have a wardrobe winner.

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Having trouble finding the best top for your size and style? As the most trusted women's clothing boutique in Piedmont, SC, Copper Penny has helped women discover new looks in the Lowcountry for more than two decades. We take pride in providing a personalized, boutique experience for our customers. If you have questions, give us a call or swing by one of our locations. We would be happy to give you our professional opinion.

Until then, here's a quick guide you can follow to help you find the right fit for your women's top in Piedmont:

How to Find the Right Fit for Your Women's Top

When choosing a women's top for your outfit, you have to consider how comfortable, confident, and beautiful you will feel. The best way to feel your best in an outfit is to make sure it fits correctly. To get started, you'll want to take your measurements. For most women's tops, the best areas to focus on are your hips, waist, and chest.

  • Hip Measurements: Measuring your hips is fairly easy. Take your measuring tape and use it to wrap around the widest area of your hips.
  • Waist Measurements: Take your measuring tape and place it at the very top of your hip bone. Wrap it all the way around your body. Try to keep your measuring tape in line with your belly button. For the most accurate measurements, stand up straight and breathe normally.
  • Chest Measurements: For an accurate chest measurement, take the end of your measuring tape and place it on the fullest area of your bust. From there, wrap the tape around your body, under your armpits, and around the blades of your shoulders. Then, wrap the tape tightly from the back of your body to the front, where you started.
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 Cloths Shop Piedmont, SC

Need help measuring? Swing by Copper Penny and ask one of our friendly sales associates to help you out! While you're there, don't forget to check out our huge selection of women's tops in Piedmont, SC.

Contact Us

Looking to take your style to the next level? You can also get in touch with a personal stylist directly from our website. With a personal stylist by your side, you can find stunning looks for specific occasions, using comfortable clothing in your favorite colors and cuts. Copper Penny is your one-stop-shop for fashionable, fun, fabulous designer clothing in Piedmont. But don't take our word for it – come see for yourself!

Latest News in Piedmont, SC

Historic site purchased for Piedmont museum, but funding is still needed

At 73 years old, Danny Oliver can remember riding his tricycle on the wooden front porch of his childhood home in Piedmont and also driving his three-wheeler through the kitchen, burning to pretend rubber while turning laps around the dining room table.Many years before the Oliver family kitchen served as Danny's racetrack, the home near the old Piedmont Manufacturing mill site operated as a multi-denominational Piedmont Union Church when it was built in 1878. It was recognized as the first building in South Carolina de...

At 73 years old, Danny Oliver can remember riding his tricycle on the wooden front porch of his childhood home in Piedmont and also driving his three-wheeler through the kitchen, burning to pretend rubber while turning laps around the dining room table.

Many years before the Oliver family kitchen served as Danny's racetrack, the home near the old Piedmont Manufacturing mill site operated as a multi-denominational Piedmont Union Church when it was built in 1878. It was recognized as the first building in South Carolina dedicated to being a YWCA facility in 1908.

It's been unoccupied in recent years.

"There's houses near the old mill starting to crumble," said Dianne Young, older sister of Danny Oliver. "I didn't want to see momma and daddy's house like that."

The white colonial-style house is now safe from the dangers of decay, demolition, and development as the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society has purchased the home from the Oliver family.

The selling price went for $140,000, which was $13,000 below the appraisal price for the .72-acre property, according to Anne Peden, chairperson of the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society.

The preservation group's intention is to rededicate the building to be a museum to commemorate the Piedmont Manufacturing Company, local textile mill history, and contribution to the local economy.

Yet, more financial help is needed to open what is to be known as the Piedmont History Museum.

"It's where it needs to be," said Darlene Peden, another sister of Danny Oliver who also grew up in the home. "You've got a lot of people who love it. I want my house saved."

The new museum is to be a centerpiece for a revitalized Piedmont, as the area is expected to have tremendous growth over the next decade.

Grants and private donors bring Piedmont museum to life

"We've been working towards this about four to five years," said Anne Peden, sister-in-law of Darlene. "We want to be the place (where) the new people come in and understand that this was the textile center of the world."

The rich history of the residence made the historic site the desired location for the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society’s museum.

“That was our first choice when we started talking about getting a place for the museum,” Anne Peden said. “We didn’t dream we’d ever be able to come up with the money to buy it.”

In late 2021, the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society submitted a grant request for $53,000 to the Greenville County Historic & Natural Resources Trust.

The house at 7 Piedmont Avenue was ultimately awarded the grant and became the only historic site to receive funding among five other natural-resource preservation efforts during that grant's cycle, according to Carlton Owen, chair at GCHNRT.

“The 220,000 people coming to Greenville (in years to come through growth) don't know the story of the textile history,” Owen said. “If we wish to continue to compete for and win funds from outside the county, it is vital that we exhibit the importance of those projects by being among the first to invest.”

“This was a project we were definitely excited to fund,” said Alex Reynolds, board member of GCHNRT. “We have a vested interest in making sure this project is continuing."

Beyond the $53,000, the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society acquired $75,000 through a land-bank program and an additional $140,000 from Steve Bichel, a local retired electrical engineer.

“I knew a lot of people from Piedmont and have a lot of respect for those folks” said Bichel, a graduate of Woodmont High who grew up near the local mill. “I’m extremely supportive of redevelopment and zoning, but some developers have no concern for history whatsoever...

“It's a combination of things: a reconnection with Piedmont, my father working in other nearby mills, and to raise awareness of the project,” he said. “At least give 5 or 10% of what I gave. I challenge people to do the same."

Money still needed to open new museum in Greenville County

The purchase of the former YWCA, Union church and Oliver family historic home is a first step, but a long list of upgrades will require more financial help to bring the building up to date to function as a museum.

As of early September, the list of building improvements amounts to $460,000, which includes estimates of:

“The purchase of the building and the preservation of our museum is the first step towards our goal of having a state-of-the-art facility here in Piedmont, South Carolina, said Charlene Spelts, marketing and communications lead for the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society. "We've set ourselves a goal on 12 to 14 months to open.

"Money is the biggest thing we need.”

The museum could open as soon as the fall of 2023. It's to feature eight rooms for educational programming, which will be open three days a week for free, and also feature meeting rooms and space for homeschooling.

There will be antiques, including various artifacts dating back to 1818, some from Don Roper's mill collection that he's gathered since 1950, as well as an organ from the original Baptist church in Piedmont.

The new space for the museum is to house it all.

"Now that we have it, we have a lot of responsibility," said Anne Peden. "Owning a public building — although we are thrilled and it's a blessing — it's a little bit daunting.

"Now we've got to keep it up and make it live a long life as a museum, and every bit helps."

– A.J. Jackson overs arts, entertainment and more for The Greenville News and Anderson Independent Mail. Contact hum by email at ajackson@gannett.com, and follow him on Twitter @ajhappened.

Former mill village Piedmont becoming a center of affordable new home activity

It’s not an incorporated town, but a census-designated area along the Saluda River best known for once being home to one of the largest textile mills in the world. The mill that birthed the place known as Piedmont burned down in the 1980s, and today only a lone smokestack remains. But it’s being discovered once again, because it’s home to one of the scarcest assets in metro Greenville—affordable housing.Once a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Greenville and Anderson counties meet, Piedmont is becoming more and...

It’s not an incorporated town, but a census-designated area along the Saluda River best known for once being home to one of the largest textile mills in the world. The mill that birthed the place known as Piedmont burned down in the 1980s, and today only a lone smokestack remains. But it’s being discovered once again, because it’s home to one of the scarcest assets in metro Greenville—affordable housing.

Once a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Greenville and Anderson counties meet, Piedmont is becoming more and more a destination for both prospective homebuyers and real estate agents searching for lower-priced homes in a market where such things have become very difficult to find. Half a dozen new home communities have sprung up around Piedmont, which features an official population of just 5,400, but average home prices which can be $50,000 less than those in the city of Greenville itself.

“Piedmont has seen tremendous growth in recent years from a residential perspective, and a new construction perspective at that, because builders are able to offer more affordable options than they would in nearby areas such as Mauldin and Simpsonville,” said Norell Mitchell Grissett, a Coldwell Banker Caine agent who’s active in the area. “Historically, land prices have been cheaper in Piedmont. And so in turn, the builders have the opportunity to offer lower prices on the homes that they would build in comparison to some more saturated areas of the Upstate.”

According to the Western Upstate Association of Realtors, the median sales price in Piedmont in January was $291,450, a 48.8 percent jump from the $195,900 of the same month in 2020. But that remains a bargain compared to January average prices of $335,000 in Fountain Inn, $353,750 in Mauldin, $360,000 in the city of Greenville north of downtown, and $650,000 in central Greenville, according to the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors.

A surge of new-home communities

And although inventory shortages exist everywhere within the greater Greenville area, Piedmont’s available supply of less expensive, developable land means more new home communities with less sticker shock. Grissett, who works for Coldwell Banker Caine’s new home division, represents Great Southern Homes, an Irmo-based company that’s building Harvest Glen, a new community that will be comprised of around 200 homes with prices starting in the low $200,000s.

Harvest Glen is approaching 100 sales in just under a year since opening, so the demand is clearly there. And Great Southern Homes is hardly the only new home builder operating in Piedmont—Cambridge Walk and Bracken Woods by D.R. Horton are offering floor plans starting in the high $200,000s, Barrington Creek by Ryan Homes is offering homes from the mid-$200,00s, and Attenborough by Eastwood Homes is offering townhomes from the mid-$200,000s.

“I think the amount of new construction offerings in Piedmont has just increased within the last few years,” Grissett said. “And I think based off the market statistics that I’ve been seeing, that trend is only going to continue. I think there’s going to be an additional surge of new communities, builders and consumers that are drawn to this area. The need for affordable housing is not going anywhere. And Piedmont will continue to offer our market a solution to that problem for some time.”

Some Greenville real estate agents will readily admit that they had never even been to Piedmont before the pandemic-fueled buying frenzy that started in mid-2020 and continues today. The area’s claim to fame was once Piedmont Manufacturing Company, a textile mill that opened in 1874 and by the turn of the century was the largest in South Carolina. But by 1977, its textile-producing days were over, according to the National Park Service, and a 1983 fire burned down a facility that had been designated a National Historic Landmark.

Since then, Piedmont has existed mainly at the fringes of Greenville’s industrial and manufacturing rebirth. Even now, “you do feel like you’re tucked away,” Grissett said. “It has a little more rural, country feel to it. It’s a little quieter, a little more laid back. But it is so close to downtown Greenville. You have shopping off West Georgia and Fairview roads. And you have easy access to that corridor of shopping on Butler Road in Mauldin. So while you have the feeling of being pulled away a little bit, you do have access to things that are convenient.”

Retail and redevelopment hopes

And almost certainly, Piedmont’s surge of new home construction will bring more nearby conveniences along with it; “retail follows rooftops,” after all, is a real estate adage that’s stood the test of time. Michelin and Lockheed Martin are among the major employers nearby, and the area now has two grocery stores anchoring shopping plazas. And “there’s absolutely going to be a need” for more commercial retail developments, Grissett added, as more new homeowners move into the area. A local developer, Larry Webb, even aims to redevelop Piedmont’s former mill village itself. State money has been earmarked to build a new pedestrian bridge over the Saluda River, and a taproom and coffee shop are planned for an old mercantile building. The ultimate goal is a picturesque riverfront downtown, just like Greenville’s.

Meanwhile, the new home building boom in Piedmont shows no signs of letting up. As of last week, Grissett had only two available homes remaining in Harvest Glen’s current phase, with a an additional phase set to come online soon. If current building trends hold—always an uncertain proposition given the supply chain issues that have hamstrung builders throughout the Upstate—the Piedmont area could soon have hundreds more new homes and thousands more new residents than it did only a few years ago.

“It would not surprise me to see 1,000 new homes within a few years’ time here, because you do have some communities that are a little bit larger than Harvest Glen, so I think you have to account for them,” Grissett said. “Some of them have closed out just fairly recently, where they went into Piedmont a few years prior to Great Southern Homes entering that market. But because those communities did so well, they now have other areas that they’re selling out of. So I would not be surprised to see those numbers increase.”

Piedmont Natural Gas selects route for critical Greenville County, S.C., Reliability Project based on community input

GREENVILLE, S.C. – After months of collaborating with local community leaders, government officials and individual landowners, Piedmont Natural Gas today said it plans to locate its Greenville County Reliability Project in the Department of Transportation (DOT) right of way running along Highway 290. The new infrastructure project is vital to meeting the demand for natural gas resulting from growth in and around Greenville.Those familiar with the project will recognize this as Piedmont’s proposed blue route. The company of...

GREENVILLE, S.C. – After months of collaborating with local community leaders, government officials and individual landowners, Piedmont Natural Gas today said it plans to locate its Greenville County Reliability Project in the Department of Transportation (DOT) right of way running along Highway 290. The new infrastructure project is vital to meeting the demand for natural gas resulting from growth in and around Greenville.

Those familiar with the project will recognize this as Piedmont’s proposed blue route. The company offered three different routes, labeled as red, green and blue, and invited landowners, business operators along each route and other community stakeholders to submit feedback and share any additional details to consider when evaluating the route options.

After reviewing community input as well as environmental impact, safety, cost and reliability, the blue route, which is roughly 12 miles long, beginning near the post office in Taylors, S.C., and ending off Highway 25, emerged as the most preferred route.

Hank McCullough, Piedmont Natural Gas community relations manager said, “working directly with this community and the impacted landowners has not only given us a clear path forward for this project, it also has allowed Piedmont to hear firsthand what’s important to the people of this community. We appreciate everyone who participated in the evaluation process and recognize there is a clear expectation that we continue to preserve and protect the environment.”

Construction of the Greenville County Reliability Project is still more than a year away with land surveys set to begin early in 2022. Piedmont says it will communicate directly with landowners and businesses along the route before land surveys begin and throughout the process until the project is complete. The company also will continue posting up-to-date project information on its website at piedmontng.com/Greenville.

The Greenville County Reliability Project is critical to meeting this growing demand for natural gas. Piedmont Natural Gas serves almost 91,000 customers in Greenville County, and experienced approximately 3% growth annually in the area in recent consecutive years.

Piedmont Natural Gas

Piedmont Natural Gas, a subsidiary of Duke Energy, is an energy services company whose principal business is the distribution of natural gas to more than 1 million residential, commercial and industrial customers in North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. The company also supplies natural gas to power plants. Piedmont is routinely recognized by J.D. Power for excellent customer satisfaction, and has been named by Cogent Reports as one of the most trusted utility brands in the U.S.

Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK), a Fortune 150 company headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., is one of America’s largest energy holding companies. Its electric utilities serve 7.9 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky, and collectively own 51,000 megawatts of energy capacity. Its natural gas unit serves 1.6 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio and Kentucky. The company employs 27,500 people.

Duke Energy is executing an aggressive clean energy strategy to create a smarter energy future for its customers and communities – with goals of at least a 50 percent carbon reduction by 2030 and net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. The company is a top U.S. renewable energy provider, on track to own or purchase 16,000 megawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2025. The company also is investing in major electric grid upgrades and expanded battery storage, and exploring zero-emitting power generation technologies such as hydrogen and advanced nuclear.

Duke Energy was named to Fortune’s 2021 “World’s Most Admired Companies” list and Forbes’ “America’s Best Employers” list. More information is available at duke-energy.com. The Duke Energy News Center contains news releases, fact sheets, photos and videos. Duke Energy’s illumination features stories about people, innovations, community topics and environmental issues. Follow Duke Energy on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook.

Piedmont Natural Gas media contact: Jennifer Sharpe Phone: 877.348.3612 Email: jennifer.sharpe@duke-energy.com

Piedmont Natural Gas files rate adjustment in South Carolina for investments to better serve customers

CHARLOTTE, N.C., April 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Piedmont Natural Gas today filed a request with the South Carolina Public Service Commission to recover recent capital investments and update its operating costs and billing rates through a general rate case proceeding.The capital investments allow Piedmont to comply with federal regulations, build needed infrastructure, and provide safe, reliable and affordable natural gas to customers.If approved, Piedmont anticipates the rates will go into effect by October 1, with the typical r...

CHARLOTTE, N.C., April 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Piedmont Natural Gas today filed a request with the South Carolina Public Service Commission to recover recent capital investments and update its operating costs and billing rates through a general rate case proceeding.

The capital investments allow Piedmont to comply with federal regulations, build needed infrastructure, and provide safe, reliable and affordable natural gas to customers.

If approved, Piedmont anticipates the rates will go into effect by October 1, with the typical residential customer in South Carolina paying, on average, just under $4 more per month, or $46 more per year.

"We work to keep costs as low as possible while continuing to reliably and safely serve our customers," said Sasha Weintraub, Piedmont Natural Gas senior vice president and president. "These investments are critical to strengthening and modernizing our system to meet the service needs of our customers and growing communities."

The overall revenue increase allocated to Piedmont's customer groups – residential, commercial and industrial – is 3.4%.

Piedmont serves about 157,000 customers in Anderson, Spartanburg, Greenville and Cherokee counties in South Carolina. Piedmont's last general rate case proceeding in South Carolina was in 2002.

Piedmont has adjusted rates through incremental changes since 2005 when the Natural Gas Rate Stabilization Act (RSA) was enacted into state law. The RSA allows Piedmont to adjust rates annually in order to align with its capital spending and changes in operating costs needed to continue to provide safe and reliable natural gas service to customers. Piedmont agreed with the South Carolina Office of Regulatory Staff in 2019 to file a general rate case no later than April 1, 2022 to conduct a more comprehensive review of rates including the allocation of costs to residential, commercial and industrial customers.

"Many of these investments were required for us to safely operate in our communities, but we know some customers may be facing economic hardships that can make any price increase challenging," Weintraub said. "There are a variety of ways customers can manage their bills through assistance programs, the equal payment plan program and using energy saving-tools."

Equal Payment Program (EPP)

This free service helps customers manage their budgets by eliminating high winter bills. The EPP program levels out a customer's natural gas bills, allowing them to pay a predictable, equal monthly amount to help avoid billing surprises. Piedmont determines this payment by adding up a customer's annual natural gas usage and then dividing it into the same payment amount each month. Learn more here.

Assistance for customers in need

Share the Warmth provides funds to local agencies to assist families with their utility bills, no matter the source of energy they use.

The Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) provides winter heating assistance to pay for gas, electric and other methods customers use to heat their homes. There are many customers who are eligible but do not apply for this annual federal benefit that can reduce heating costs for low-income families. More information: http://oeo.sc.gov/liheap.html

Energy-saving tools

Piedmont Natural Gas also offers a variety of energy-saving tools to help customers and our communities identify ways to save money and energy all year long. These programs and tools help customers understand what factors are impacting their natural gas bills and emphasize specific actions they can take to reduce the impacts of high winter usage.

Piedmont Natural Gas

Piedmont Natural Gas, a subsidiary of Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK), distributes natural gas to more than 1.1 million residential, commercial, industrial and power generation customers in North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. Piedmont is routinely recognized by J.D. Power for excellent customer satisfaction, and has been named by Cogent Reports as one of the most trusted utility brands in the U.S. More information: piedmontng.com. Follow Piedmont Natural Gas: Twitter, Facebook.

Media contact: Meghan MilesMedia Line: 877.348.3612Email: meghan.miles@duke-energy.com

SOURCE Piedmont Natural Gas

Developers hope Piedmont Mill Village transformation sparks revitalization in Piedmont

Like any good investor, Larry Webb always does his homework before diving into a big new project.There’s the usual data to pore over: census figures, area demographics, zoning due diligence, market trends, and so on.But when it comes to the planned transformation of the old Piedmont Mill Village, a portion of which Webb is personally financing himself, the prime motivating factor had nothing to do with numbers.Instead, it was a car full of young people that sealed the deal for him.“I l...

Like any good investor, Larry Webb always does his homework before diving into a big new project.

There’s the usual data to pore over: census figures, area demographics, zoning due diligence, market trends, and so on.

But when it comes to the planned transformation of the old Piedmont Mill Village, a portion of which Webb is personally financing himself, the prime motivating factor had nothing to do with numbers.

Instead, it was a car full of young people that sealed the deal for him.

“I live in Piedmont, have for years, so I’m very familiar with the area and the history of the mill,” Webb said.

Anyone who has ever drifted lazily in a kayak down the Saluda River is likely familiar with the site of the former mill village. The historic mill building, Piedmont Number One, was built in 1873 by Henry Pinckney Hammett of the Piedmont Manufacturing Company. As the years went by, another mill, Piedmont Number Two, was built across the river, and the company became one of the world’s largest textile mills and a leader in the global industry, with four mills running simultaneously.

The old historic mill building was built in 1905 Piedmont Mill Village shut down its mills in 1977.

The spinning of the mills’ 5,000 spindles and 112 looms spurred a hub of commercial activity, and thus the Piedmont Mill Village was born.

But that once-thriving village has now fallen silent, after the mills shut down in 1977 and Piedmont One burned down in a fire five years later. All that remains now is the old smokestack, a monument of a lost era.

The right track

It just so happened that Webb was standing in front of that old smokestack a few months ago when a car full of young people pulled up and came to a slow stop behind him. The strangers got out and asked Webb what he was up to.

He told them his plans to transform the old Piedmont Manufacturing Mercantile Building into a commercial hub, restoring it to its original purpose. The building, also referred to as a community store, was built in 1905 but has sat languishing for years.

“Larry told me about this moment, how the girl in the car mentioned that they were so glad to hear it,” said Greenville County Councilman Lynn Ballard, who spoke with Webb shortly thereafter. “The young people told him, ‘Several of us are really interested in moving to Piedmont because we can afford it, since it’s much cheaper than Greenville,’ but they said they wanted the amenities young folks want — coffee shops, restaurants, cafes.”

That moment was all Webb needed to know he was on the right track.

“I’d already thought this was a beautiful building,” Webb said. “I’d talked to business leaders, the Lions Club, Rotary Club, and everyone said that if we can get downtown back to life, it would be a tremendous boon to the community. Now we’re fully committed to making it happen as soon as possible.”

Four mills ran on the Saluda River in Piedmont for decades, beginning in the 1870s, creating a hub of activity, including office, retail and a village area.

But despite his urgency, unforeseen roadblocks have led to the project being one year behind schedule.

Webb purchased the mercantile building back in 2018 and spent 18 months going through the historical tax credit qualification, an arduous process requiring him to get the building on the historic register. Once he was finally approved, he went through the redesign process, making sure the building met all the criteria the state and federal government require to get the building back to its historic condition.

Meanwhile, Webb worked to get pre-lease agreements for more than 65% of the space, with plans for a tap house, a coffee shop, a restaurant, office space and an art gallery, with apartments planned for the second floor.

Construction was all set to begin in March 2020, with occupancy planned for spring of 2021.

“Then the virus hit,” Webb said. “We decided it wouldn’t be wise to begin the restoration of the building and get it ready for occupancy if businesses weren’t allowed to operate, so we put a temporary moratorium on the restoration to wait out the virus.”

Now the restoration is set to start on a new timeline, beginning late spring, with occupancy by the spring of 2022.

A riverfront community

The restoration of the old mercantile building is one of two major projects ongoing in the old mill village. Developer Brad Skelton, of Red Oak Developers, is also working on building a riverfront community of townhouses in the spot where the old mill buildings once stood.

Plans are still preliminary, but discussions have been about the project featuring a new brewery, retail space, green space and as many as 60 townhouses.

Kayak access via a dock is also part of the plans, as is a pedestrian bridge where the old steam pipe once crossed the river behind the waterfalls, creating “pedestrian connectivity between Anderson and Greenville counties,” according to Webb.

“You’re going to have people now able to come back down to Piedmont to grab something to eat, grab a beer, hang out,” Webb said. “There’s going to be a lot of public interaction, so five years from now, we envision downtown is going to be the center of activity in Piedmont once again.”

Did you know?

Correction: a previous version of this story stated that developer Richard Greer, of State Investors, was involved in the riverfront community alongside Brad Skelton. We have since learned that Greer passed away in November. We apologize for the mistake.

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